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NIGHT SKATE SESSION - Pushing the ISO Limits of the Canon 5D Mark II

Went for a night skate session with my boy, Benfy the other night. We had 2 LightPro 54W 900 LEDs from Dragon Image to light up the park. With no-one else around, Benfy was loving it !

Trusty LighPro LEDs and Benfy's 50/50 on the downrail. 

Trusty LighPro LEDs and Benfy's 50/50 on the downrail. 

I had my Canon 5D Mark II and decided not to use on camera flash but just the light from my LEDs. This would give me quite dramatic and contrasty exposures which I intended to process as black and white images.

I started shooting at 1/200s, f2.8, ISO 2000 and quickly realised there wasn't enough light from the LEDs, underexposing my images by around 2 stops.  

Underexposed Kickflip @ 1/200s, f2.8, ISO 2000

Underexposed Kickflip @ 1/200s, f2.8, ISO 2000

One option to improve the exposure was to bring the LEDs closer. Using the rule of thumb that if I halve the distance between the subject (i.e. Benfy) and the light source (i.e. LEDs), that will increase the exposure by 1 stop. In other words, if the LEDs were 8 metres from Benfy, I could move them closer to 4 metres and this would give me 1 stop more light. Having spent a quite few bucks on these awesome LEDs, I wasn't willing to risk a flying skateboard taking them down, so we left them at a safe distance from the action.

Another challenge was trying to get the focus and limited depth of field right shooting a moving subject at f2.8 in low light. At the same time 1/200s seemed too slow to freeze the action, especially when Benfy was doing flip tricks.

After a couple of test exposures, I decided to settle on 1/320s, closed down to f3.5 for slightly more depth of field and pumped the ISO up to 6400. Also I reluctantly brought the LEDs closer by 2 metres. So in summary, I lost 2/3 stop in light from shutter speed (from 1/200 to 1/320) and 2/3 stop in light from aperture (from f2.8 to f3.5) but gained 1 and 2/3 stop in light from ISO (increased from 2000 to 6400) + 1/2 stop extra light by moving the LEDs closer. After all that, I got 1 more stop of light (I hope my maths is right !).

Alright, so after getting the exposure to where I wanted it to be, away we went with Benfy doing his thing.

This was so much fun and gave me a chance to test the ISO capabilities of the Canon 5D Mark II. Shooting at ISO 6400, there was definitely noticeable noise and grain appearing in the image when viewed at 200%.

ISO 6400 - Noise noticeable at 100% and 200% as shown above

ISO 6400 - Noise noticeable at 100% and 200% as shown above

The Adobe Lightroom Noise Reduction tool does help to remove the grain and noise. I recommend slight adjustments with the "Color" and "Detail" settings followed by adjusting the "Luminance" slider until you get the desired result.

Noise Reduction settings I applied to the image below...

Noise Reduction settings I applied to the image below...

After applying Noise Reduction - 200%

After applying Noise Reduction - 200%

Another thing to remember is that Sharpening in Adobe Lightroom will have the opposite effect of Noise Reduction so I generally don't touch sharpening if I'm trying to reduce noise.

Sharpening increased to 100 has re-introduced noise after Noise reduction took it away.

Sharpening increased to 100 has re-introduced noise after Noise reduction took it away.

Shooting at night and photographing a moving subject, faster shutter speeds and greater depth of field was more important to me than the grain introduced with the high ISO. The 5D Mark II ISO can go up to 25600 - I might try this next time as 6400 still gave me an acceptable image for the black and white result I had set out to achieve.

For the final image I did have to increase the exposure by 1/2 stop in Adobe Lightroom and add a small amount of contrast with an S tone curve. Otherwise, everything else in camera...

 

 

In the style of Tim Hixson. / Holga / Lomo Project

Tim Hixson is a Sydney based commercial photographer who has produced a mix of seascape, beach life, portraiture and abstract work using Holga plastic cameras for his personal portfolio. The cameras are cheap (less the $100) and available in 35mm and medium format film with a fixed focal length lens, one shutter speed (1/100) and a couple of apertures to choose from (f8, f11).

Tim has commented on the unpredictability of the Holga cameras from light leaks, cheap lens materials, shutter problems to the point where no two cameras are the same. It is this imperfection that can bring about unknown, but at the same time refreshing results. Additionally, in a world of Digital Photography and the comfort of a camera LCD with limitless storage space for multiple images until the right one appears, the Holga forces you to call on the technical understanding of photography. 

http://www.holgacamera.com/holga-cameras/

http://www.holgacamera.com/holga-cameras/


Limitations in the aperture, shutter speed and film speed encourages thought about composition and capturing an image before pressing the shutter. Available light and an understanding of reciprocity to compromise with the camera in order to achieve somewhat close results to originally intended is definitely required.

Although, I don’t have a Holga camera…yet, I set about trying to reproduce the same effect with my Canon digital SLR and post processing in Lightroom and Photoshop.

Being a surfer and spending a great deal of time at the beach, I found a connection with Tim’s personal work as he also seems to enjoy the ocean and beach life. Geographically we are not far apart (no more than 30kms as the crow flies) and therefore, the coastline is very much alike between Sydney’s northern beaches and the Central Coast. This help with my composition in attempting to shoot in the same style as Tim.

So what did I have in mind to get this started?

1.     High contrast images with harsh bright whites (sometimes completely blown out) and deep blacks on headlands, rocks and clouds.

2.     Long exposures were out as the Holga was limited to one shutter speed of 1/100…and fast shutter speeds were out also…actually the aim was to produce an image which looked like a shutter speed in the 1/100 range was used.

3.     Overcast conditions or a high contrast range between the subject matter the scene. Dark headland in the background, some stormy cloud detail and breaking waves 

4.     Post processing –

a.     Add a vignette

b.     Curve adjustments to introduce chromatic aberration (reds, greens, blues) that the Holga is capable of producing

c.      Increase contrast levels

d.     Brush in some light spots to mimic Holga light leaks

Image 1 - Macs

from Tim Hixson's "Beach" exhibition - http://www.timhixsonphotography.com.au

from Tim Hixson's "Beach" exhibition - http://www.timhixsonphotography.com.au

Tim’s image above of Avalon Beach reminded me of the perspective you get from Copacabana Beach on the Central Coast as you look back towards Macmasters. Instead of recreating a similar composition, I decided to instead photograph at Macmasters looking out from the southern point. Like Tim’s image below, I shot my image in the morning with the sun in the east, providing bright highlight and contrast with the clouds (probably a little too early at around 8am). There were three surfers in the water. I decided to remove two of them as the lone surfer, for me, gave more impact which would fit with the feel I had in mind for the image.

The raw image below…

Raw unedited image in Lightroom

Raw unedited image in Lightroom

Converted to Black and White in Lightroom and two surfers removed with Content Aware in Photoshop.

Converted to Black and White in Lightroom and two surfers removed with Content Aware in Photoshop.

Selection using Quick Mask

Selection using Quick Mask

Curves Layer added to the mask, pulled down the middle of the curve to create the vignette. Then feathered the edge

Curves Layer added to the mask, pulled down the middle of the curve to create the vignette. Then feathered the edge

Lightroom vignette -  The vignette can also be applied in Lightroom, but, for me, the vignette is too uniform and obvious that it’s done in post.

Lightroom vignette -  The vignette can also be applied in Lightroom, but, for me, the vignette is too uniform and obvious that it’s done in post.

Once the vignette was applied, I added another curves layer to increase contrast and give more harshness to the light

Once the vignette was applied, I added another curves layer to increase contrast and give more harshness to the light

Lifted Red and Green curves individually and dropped the Blues a touch for a bit more Lomo effect

Lifted Red and Green curves individually and dropped the Blues a touch for a bit more Lomo effect

Final image below...

Image 2 - Paddle Out

From my attempts to reproduce the holga / lomo effect, I realised that ultimately there is a fine line between making the images look authentically "holga-ish" (if that's a word) and producing images that look like you've tried too hard to churn out something not suited for high end DSLRs.

At the end of the day, I guess it comes down to the individual as to how they plan a shoot and the emphasis they put on workflow - before, during and after a shoot. For me, the more time I spend behind the lens, the better. Spending the time to get it right in camera is what I will always work to achieve. Less Photoshop, more beach time - yeah !

Looks like it's plastic camera time !


Gerrit Fokkema - Australian Vernacular Exhibition

I recently visited the Australian Vernacular Photographic exhibition at the NSW Art Gallery in Sydney. One photographer who stood out for me was Gerrit Fokkema.

Gerrit learnt photography from a school boy age, self taught and contributing for his school magazine in country NSW. He worked as press photographer for the Canberra Times and Sydney Morning Herald and his images show a style of reportage. The thing that attracted me to Gerrit's images were the feeling of everyday Australia and different classes in their environment.

Blacktown Man

Blacktown Man gives a stereotypical feel to the western suburbs of the 1980's. The harsh light, bright highlights and deep shadows fit well with the landscape and the tough environment that was life for many in the west. 

Blacktown Man by Gerrit Fokkema - 1983

Blacktown Man by Gerrit Fokkema - 1983

Woman Hosing

The modern brick veneer housing of new suburbs in Canberra in the 70's and 80's fits well with the neatly dressed woman afforded the time to hose down the gutter and road in front of the family abode. Newly laid turf, street lighting with underground cabling, no sign of rubbish or clutter along with a clear sunny day all help to portray a clean and healthy life in the nation's capital. The element of line is very prominent in this image and add to simplistic and orderly composition - very much suited to life in Canberra in the 70's and 80's.

Woman Hosing, Canberra by Gerrit Fokkema - 1979

Woman Hosing, Canberra by Gerrit Fokkema - 1979

More recent examples of Gerrit's work can be found at http://www.fokkema.com.au

Burnside Uniting Care by Gerrit Fokkema

Burnside Uniting Care by Gerrit Fokkema


Popart

Pop art begun in the mid 1950’s and was the creation of several young adults in Britain with the aim of bringing a new creative, fun and bright movement to the world. Pop art focuses on what is popular in culture and was around after the war which characterised a sense optimism during the post was consumer boom of the 50’s and 60’s. This is where the name pop art comes from, being popular culture. Pop art was big during the globalisation of pop music and youth culture. The British artists behind pop art grew up in a very dull world of ration books and utility design. They saw America as a land of freedom, a more inclusive and youthful culture that embraced social influence of mass media and mass production. Pop art was greatly influenced by dada collages which was combinations of random images to gain a reaction from the establishment of that time. Pop art was similar to this although focused instead on popular culture. A movement that is similar to pop art is surrealism. Surrealism combined the collage and unique style of pop art/photo illustration where photos are edited or illustrated which also uses the contrasting colours

Source - http://www.slideshare.net/jackjsargent/pop-art-photographers

 Andy Warhol was influencial in the creation of the American pop art movement. One of his most recognisable images is from the print series of Marilyn Monroe, which were created after her death in 1962.

The art of Andy Warhol is a analysis on the condition of society and the obsession with fame and the famous. This included Andy, as he was completely enchanted by the American royalty status of movie stars and celebrities. He was overwhelmed by the power that tv network had over the ordinary person and saw the glowing box as something that was worshiped more often than most people go to church.

Source - http://blog.artbyveny.com/andy-warhols-famous-marilyn-monroe-painting/

Marilyn Monroe by Andy Warhol. 1962

Marilyn Monroe by Andy Warhol. 1962

My Pop Art Experiment

My wonderful daughter has been the inspiration of many photographic projects. For the Pop Art project, I shot a series of images in front of an old boat shed. The weather was overcast, cold and windy. The shed provided some protection from the wind but just enough to blow her hair around. The overcast conditions gave a flat even lighting.

I shot at 70mm from 10 metres with fill flash to light Sally brightly and also some highlight on the boat shed door.

The background water, boat and horizon didn't interest me that much, so I added colour to 4 different selections and left the outline of the distant hills to break up the colour

Also reduced the perceptual colours from 256 to 30 in Photoshop, Indexed Colour. This gives an illustrated feel to the image.

Additional quick mask selections and changes to colour balance enhanced the pop art look...

The second Pop Art image 


Cubism

Cubism was a truly revolutionary style of modern art developed by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braques. It was the first style of abstract art which evolved at the beginning of the 20th century in response to a world that was changing with unprecedented speed. Cubism was an attempt by artists to revitalise the tired traditions of Western art which they believed had run their course. The Cubists challenged conventional forms of representation, such as perspective, which had been the rule since the Renaissance. Their aim was to develop a new way of seeing which reflected the modern age.

In the four decades from 1870-1910, western society witnessed more technological progress than in the previous four centuries. During this period, inventions such as photography, cinematography, sound recording, the telephone, the motor car and the airplane heralded the dawn of a new age. The problem for artists at this time was how to reflect the modernity of the era using the tired and trusted traditions that had served art for the last four centuries. Photography had begun to replace painting as the tool for documenting the age and for artists to sit illustrating cars, planes and images of the new technologies was not exactly rising to the challenge. Artists needed a more radical approach - a 'new way of seeing' that expanded the possibilities of art in the same way that technology was extending the boundaries of communication and travel. This new way of seeing was called Cubism - the first abstract style of modern art. Picasso and Braque developed their ideas on Cubism around 1907 in Paris and their starting point was a common interest in the later paintings of Paul Cézanne.

source - http://www.artyfactory.com/art_appreciation/art_movements/cubism.htm

Image by Noah Watenmaker - http://gizmodo.com/5696612/34-captivating-cubist-photos

Image by Noah Watenmaker - http://gizmodo.com/5696612/34-captivating-cubist-photos

Photography by Lourdes Delgado - http://www.artsjournal.com/jazzbeyondjazz/2007/08/cubistjazz_photo_portraits.html

Photography by Lourdes Delgado - http://www.artsjournal.com/jazzbeyondjazz/2007/08/cubistjazz_photo_portraits.html

Lourdes comments about the image above...

"Jeff is composed by 20 black and white contact prints, from 4×5″ negatives, and mounted on a 24×24″ black museum board. I use each entire negative without cropping or enlarging. The visual experience seems hyper real, allowing the viewer to see details normally not perceived. For example, one discovers the reflection of Jeff’s eyelashes in the iris of his big eye and realizes that they are shown in reverse as in a concave mirror."

I have wanted to experiment with cubism photography of waves and the beach. Below is one exposure split up in photoshop.

Terrigal Haven, NSW Central Coast

Terrigal Haven, NSW Central Coast

The next step is to take multiple exposures of the same beach / wave scene and mesh them together. As the subject is not static (i.e. waves breaking), I'm hoping this concept will work. Back soon with the results.

Surrealism

Surrealism in photography was one of the major revolutionary changes in the evolution of photography. Rather than art, photography was reviewed as a copying effort. Surrealism is the introduction of the 'more than real' images to the art forms.

Surrealism was a movement in the art and intellectual activities, emerged after World War I. Andre Breton, was the founder of the surrealistic concepts and he has gathered the influence from the Dande movement. Surrealism is actually the real expression of mental emotions, without any polishing. Andre Breton describes surrealism in Surrealist Manifesto, as the pure psychic automatism expressed in the real functionality of a person. Surrealistic art forms characteristically differ from the conventional forms in not having specific shape or idea. It can be the expression of basic human instinct and imaginative faculties of the unconscious mind. But, when surrealism comes to photography, the critics did not even imagine such a possibility. However, "Marquise Casati" by Man Ray, made a change to the belief, as it featured multiple eyes for the photograph. Even though, it was an accidental blurring, it proved the chances for the feasibility of surrealistic works.

Man Ray and Lee Miller are considered as legends in surrealistic photography as they were very successful to overcome the limitations of photography to create surrealistic images. Maurice Tabard is another famous surrealist, who had his own technique for surrealistic imaging. Hans Bellmer creatively used mechanical dolls to symbolize sexualized images, where as for Rene Magritte camera was the tool to make photographic equivalents of his paintings.

Surrealist photographs are described as the images, which symbolically represent dreams, night mares, intoxication, sexual ecstasy, hallucination and madness. The difficulty with photography medium is that it imbibes the reality, and often the real images cannot be sufficient to express such unconventional patterns. But, the famous surrealist photographers are able to fulfill the task since they can use the photographic techniques effectively. The ordinary snapshots, body photographs, anthropological photographs, medical photographs, movie stills, and even police photographs are manipulated to create the impression of surrealist images in the photographs.

Surrealism in photography is mainly performed using the different techniques. The differential techniques of light and lenses can itself be the primary technique for surrealism. Photomontage is one of the popular processing techniques, in which the several images are coupled together. In photogram, a photographic paper can be used instead of camera to imprint the image. The images produced by the flush of light can create amazing images that has a surrealistic look.

Multiple exposure is another technique for surrealism, in which the camera is clicked twice or more, without rolling the negative. The second image will be superimposed on the first image and the final product will be an undefined mixture of both. Cliche verre or glass negative is the surrealistic technique that uses negative coated from glass plate. Anyhow, solarization or Sabattier effect seems to be the most remarkable technique for surrealism. It produces dramatic effect of patterns through the flushing of the light on the photograph, while developing in the darkroom. It was discovered by Lee Miller, which have selective reversal of highlights and shadows. The light and dark areas with the distinct line of reversal make it most appropriate for surrealism.

Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Domen_Lombergar

http://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2013/06/thomas-barbeys-astounding-surrealism/

My initial attempt at surrealism in camera without photoshop manipulation (i.e. only levels adjustments). A long exposure has created the smooth water and also dragged the clouds out.

Yattalunga Wharf, Central Coast NSW  

Yattalunga Wharf, Central Coast NSW

 

Further manipulation of this image in Photoshop. There were originally 2 posts that this boat was moored to. I removed the posts to leave the chain hanging in mid air.

Woy Woy Channel, NSW Central Coast

Woy Woy Channel, NSW Central Coast


Modernism

A general term used to encompass trends in photography from roughly 1910-1950 when photographers began to produce works with a sharp focus and an emphasis on formal qualities, exploiting, rather than obscuring, the camera as an essentially mechanical and technological tool. Also referred to as Modernist Photography, this approach abandoned the Pictorialist mode that had dominated the medium for over 50 years throughout the United States, Latin America, Africa, and Europe. Critic Sadakichi Hartmann’s 1904 “Plea for a Straight Photography” heralded this new approach, rejecting the artistic manipulations, soft focus, and painterly quality of Pictorialism and praising the straightforward, unadulterated images of modern life in the work of artists such as Alfred Stieglitz. Innovators like Paul Strand and Edward Weston would further expand the artistic capabilities and techniques of photography, helping to establish it as an independent art form.

Man Ray

http://forestrat.wordpress.com/tag/ansel-adams/

Ray Metzker was born in 1931 in Milwaukee and attended the Institute of Design, Chicago--a renowned school that had a few years earlier been dubbed the New Bauhaus-- from 1956 to 1959. He was thus an heir to the avant-garde photography that had developed in Europe in the 1920's. Early in his career, his work was marked by unusual intensity. Composites, multiple-exposure, superimposition of negatives, juxtapositions of two images, solarization and other formal means were part and parcel of his vocabulary.  He was committed to discovering the potential of black and white photography during the shooting and the printing, and has shown consummate skill in each stage of the photographic process. Ray Metzker's unique and continually evolving mastery of light, shadow and line transform the ordinary in the realm of pure visual delight.

 

My attempt at Modernism - Darling Harbour, Sydney 

My attempt at Modernism - Darling Harbour, Sydney 

Clean straight lines, monotone, emphasis on strength and power. Darling Harbour, Sydney

Clean straight lines, monotone, emphasis on strength and power. Darling Harbour, Sydney

Kelly Slater moves on from Quiksilver

Quiksilver and Kelly Slater back in 1990.

Quiksilver and Kelly Slater back in 1990.

Kelly Slater has just announced a split from his sponsor of 20+ years, Quiksilver. I remember the first video (yes VHS!) Quiksilver released on Kelly back in the early 90's, "Kelly Slater in Black and White". It was clear to see he had something special about his surfing - untapped natural ability plus a competitive drive to be more than just one of the top guys. In that video, he commented on Tom Curren as an influence and saw Tom as the bench mark in competition with 3 world titles. From watching Kelly over the past 20 years, I can see inspiration drawn from Curren's fluent, effortless style but longevity on tour was something else. Kelly has won 11 world titles and been on tour for 23 years. Of the 23 years on tour, he has ranked outside the top ten only 3 times (his first 3 years on tour).

Will we ever see competitive surfing talent as good as Kelly Slater ? Not sure in my lifetime.

Will we see more free surfing from Kelly after the tour this year ? He could be coming to a beach near you !

Will we see more free surfing from Kelly after the tour this year ? He could be coming to a beach near you !

Read the article below from the ASP to find out what he's up to. Maybe an April Fool's prank ?

Source: http://www.aspworldtour.com/posts/35202/sl...

Pictorialism

The art movement of Pictorialism began in the mid 19th century and was given prominence at the turn of the century (early 1900's) to advance the artisitc appeal and qualities of photography. The promotion of photography as an art rather than just a means of documenting events, people, history etc...

Pictorialist photographers wanted to capture expressive and emotional artwork by concentrating on the feel of the image as a dominant feature over the subject being recorded.

The Hand of Man, 1903 by Alfred Stieglitz

The Hand of Man, 1903 by Alfred Stieglitz

A soft feel to the images, graininess, sepia tone, elements of blur and a style similar impressionism painting can contribute the Pictorialism style. Atmospheric conditions such as fog, humidity and rain can add to the emotional impact as well.

Note-able photographers who were at the forefront of Pictorialism included Gertrude Kasebier, Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen. In 1902, Käsebier was a founder—along with Stieglitz—of the Photo-Secession, an organization that promoted Pictorialism. See examples below of their work...  

The Manger, 1899 by Gertrude Kasebier

The Manger, 1899 by Gertrude Kasebier

Woods, Twilight, 1899 by Edward Steichen

Woods, Twilight, 1899 by Edward Steichen

http://woodygooch.com/ocean/

http://woodygooch.com/ocean/

There are elements of pictorialism evident today in surf photography and I think the atmospheric side of this style blends well with surf photography. Surfing itself is an expression of art. It's been said many times before...the wave is your canvas and the lines you draw are the brush strokes...it is open to interpretation and limited by your free will and inventiveness to discover new ways to approach surfing a wave.  I like the way Woody Gooch has captured the feeling of isolation in many of his images and used environmental conditions to add to the pictorialism style. Rain drops creating bokeh on the lens, using shallow depth of field, shooting low or soft light low contrast / mid tones. The images here are a few I selected which I can relate to as a surfer. They may not evoke the same feeling with everyone but for me surfing is not just about catching waves, it's everything else you experience that gets you to that point of being in a position of presence - just you and the ocean.

http://woodygooch.com/ocean/

My Attempt at Pictorialism

Stockings and Vaseline and away we go !

Stockings and Vaseline and away we go !

To reproduce the pictorialism style, a stocking was used over the lens filter. I tried tan and black stockings not worrying too much if there was a ladder or hole or rip in the stocking as this seemed to add to the effect. 

Vaseline on the filter (not on the lens !!!) around the edges of the frame smeared lightly also works well to give a blurred vignette look.

A couple of approaches to camera settings worked for me.

1. High ISOs (2000+) for added noise and shallower depth of field (f5.6)

2. Low ISOs (200 or less) and greater depth of field (up to f18) allowed for slower shutter speeds and motion blur which added to the feel of the image.

Metadata - ISO 50, f18 at 5 secs + black torn stocking + vaseline on edges

Metadata - ISO 50, f18 at 5 secs + black torn stocking + vaseline on edges

Metadata - ISO 50, f18 at 3.2 secs + vaseline on edges

Metadata - ISO 50, f18 at 3.2 secs + vaseline on edges

Metadata - ISO 2500, f9.0 @ 1/3200 + vaseline on edges

Metadata - ISO 2500, f9.0 @ 1/3200 + vaseline on edges

Metadata - ISO 2500, f4.0 at 1/320 + vaseline

Metadata - ISO 2500, f4.0 at 1/320 + vaseline

Metadata - ISO 50, f11 at 25 secs + vaseline

Metadata - ISO 50, f11 at 25 secs + vaseline


Terrigal

Sorry to those who I met at the Markets yesterday at Terrigal and could't offer any images of Terrigal. Not sure what I was thinking !!???!

I will make sure there's something next time. Below are a few images I've photographed previously. They're not my personal favourites but you might like them. I am working on some new Terrigal shots hopefully for the Markets in Feb.

Enjoy !

Terrigal Pool, 2013 Metadata - 75 sec, f 16, ISO 50 at 25mm, ambient light.

Terrigal Pool, 2013

Metadata - 75 sec, f 16, ISO 50 at 25mm, ambient light.

Terrigal Haven, 2010 Metadata - 4 sec, f 16, ISO 50 at 25mm

Terrigal Haven, 2010

Metadata - 4 sec, f 16, ISO 50 at 25mm

Terrigal Pool, 2010 Metadata - 0.6 sec, f 22, ISO 50 at 24mm

Terrigal Pool, 2010

Metadata - 0.6 sec, f 22, ISO 50 at 24mm